Transitioning into Conventional Housing Narratives of Houseless Individuals

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Transitioning into Conventional Housing Narratives of Houseless Individuals, Is A Well-Researched Topic, It Is To Be Used As A Guide Or Framework For Your Research.

ABSTRACT

Past research has shown that it is possible for individuals to exit houselessness. However, it does little to provide insights into the types of experiences and events that facilitate these moves towards housing stability. This study explores in-depth interviews, utilizing an interview guide with 12 individuals who exited houselessness in Portland, Oregon. This research project seeks to understand the conditions that influence successful exits out of houselessness from the perspective of the lived
experiences of once houseless individuals. This study utilizes two theoretical frameworks, the theory of Habitus (Bourdieu, 1977 & Wacquant, 1998) and the networking theory of Strong and Weak Ties (Granovetter, 1973), as the conceptual underpinning of this work.

Habitus is the totality of one’s resources which include social capital, (i.e., education, social class, and networks) economic capital (i.e.money
and wealth), it is the totality of acquired experiences, and is expanded by day-to-day interactions. Through the utility of Habitus individuals learn how to maneuver in and out of houselessness. Granovetter’s work also focuses on the value of social interactions. According to Granovetter, one’s extended social network serves as an informational storehouse where knowledge is gained and transferred. These extended networks may prove to be ways in which individuals learn about services and programs that aid in houseless exits. Although both theories are somewhat dated, they are relevant for this study of individuals who have transitioned into housing stability. This study employs these theoretical frameworks to explore the social factors and conditions that enable houseless individuals to make the transition. It relies on narratives developed from interviews with 12 formerly houseless individuals and a grounded theoretical approach to uncover the processes, connections, and conditions that facilitate transitions out of houselessness. These conditions include access to institutional support that was provided from a variety of entry points ranging from contact with the criminal
justice system, drug and alcohol programs, social service agencies; and access to social network supports that was facilitated primarily via family, friends, and acquaintances that leverage social capital. This study builds on previous research on houseless individuals who have integrated into conventional housing and lays the framework for future research on factors which facilitate such exits.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ABSTRACT …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. i
DEDICATION ………………………………………………………………………………………………. iii
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ……………………………………………………………………………… iv
LIST OF TABLES …………………………………………………………………………………………. vii
LIST OF FIGURES ……………………………………………………………………………………… viii
PREFACE ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 1
CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION ……………………………………………………………………….. 3
1.1 The New Population of Houseless Individuals ……………………………………….. 4
1.2 Oregon and the Statistics on Houselessness for 2017 ………………………………. 5
1.3 Definitions of Houselessness ……………………………………………………………….. 6
1.4 Homeless – Houseless ………………………………………………………………………….. 7
1.5 Purpose and Research Design ………………………………………………………………. 8
CHAPTER 2 LITERATURE REVIEW ……………………………………………………………. 10
2.1 Major Causes of Houselessness ………………………………………………………….. 10
2.2 Impact of Social Networks, Friends, Family, and Associations ………………. 12
2.3 Social Service Agencies and Supportive Networks ……………………………….. 15
2.4 Subjective Well-Being and Happiness …………………………………………………. 17
2.5 Summary …………………………………………………………………………………………. 20
CHAPTER 3 THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK ………………………………………………… 22
3.1 The Theory of Habitus ………………………………………………………………………. 22
3.2 The Utility of Habitus to the Houseless ……………………………………………….. 24
3.3 The Networking Theory of Strength of Weak Ties ………………………………… 25
3.4 The Utility of The Strength of Weak Ties …………………………………………….. 25
CHAPTER 4 METHODOLOGY …………………………………………………………………….. 28
4.1 Participant Selection and Recruitment …………………………………………………. 29
4.2 Data Collection …………………………………………………………………………………. 32
4.3 Data Analysis …………………………………………………………………………………… 32
CHAPTER 5 FINDINGS ………………………………………………………………………………… 34
5.1 Demographic Participant Information Table …………………………………………. 34
5.2 Demographic Information Related to Findings ……………………………………… 35
5.3 Thematic Findings …………………………………………………………………………….. 37
5.4 Emergent Themes Tables 3-9 ……………………………………………………………… 39

5.4.1 My Mind’s Made Up ………………………………………………………………….. 40
5.4.2 Social Networks …………………………………………………………………………. 43
5.4.3 Social Service Support ………………………………………………………………… 46
5.4.4 Resilience ………………………………………………………………………………….. 51
5.4.5 Feelings of Achieving Housing Stability ……………………………………….. 54
5.4.6 Change in Social Networks ………………………………………………………….. 57
5.4.7 New Identity………………………………………………………………………………. 60
CHAPTER 6 DISCUSSION ……………………………………………………………………………. 63
6.1 Exit Strategies ………………………………………………………………………………….. 63
6.1.1 My Mind’s Made Up ………………………………………………………………….. 64
6.1.2 Social Networks …………………………………………………………………………. 65
6.1.3 Social Services …………………………………………………………………………… 66
6.1.4 Resilience ………………………………………………………………………………….. 67
6.1.5 Feelings of Achieving Housing Stability ……………………………………….. 68
6.1.6 Changes in Social Networks ………………………………………………………… 68
6.1.7 New identity ………………………………………………………………………………. 69
6.2 Resources ………………………………………………………………………………………… 71
6.2.1 Personal Networks ……………………………………………………………………… 71
6.2.2 Resilience ………………………………………………………………………………….. 72
6.2.3 Social Networks Post Transition …………………………………………………… 72
6.2.4 New Identity………………………………………………………………………………. 73
CHAPTER 7 REFLECTION AND CONCLUSION ………………………………………….. 74
7.1 Racial Disparities in Houseless Individuals ………………………………………….. 75
7.2 Understandings of Success …………………………………………………………………. 76
7.3 Policy Implications ……………………………………………………………………………. 76
7.4 Limitations ………………………………………………………………………………………. 78
7.5 Future Directions ………………………………………………………………………………. 78
REFERENCES ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 80
APPENDIX A: SAMPLE INTERVIEW GUIDE ………………………………………………. 89
APPENDIX B: INFORMED CONSENT ………………………………………………………….. 90
APPENDIX C: OPENING STATEMENT ………………………………………………………… 91
APPENDIX D: OPENING STATEMENT ……………………………………………………….. 92
APPENDIX E FREE OR FEE BASED COUNSELLING SERVICES IN
PORTLAND OREGON ………………………………………………………………………………….. 93

Brand

YourPastQuestions Brand

Additional information

Author

Joyce La Belle McNair

No of Chapters

7

No of Pages

104

Reference

YES

Format

PDF

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