Farmer knowledge and management of crop disease

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Description

Farmer knowledge and management of crop disease is a well-researched topic, it can be used as a guide or framework for your Academic Research.

Abstract.

Nearly all contemporary people subsist on cultivated plants, most of which are vulnerable to diseases. Yet, there have been few studies of what traditional people know – and do not know – about crop disease.
Agricultural scientists in general are becoming aware of the potential contribution of social scientists and farmers in developing integrated management of crop diseases. The International Potato Center (CIP) has focused on stimulating farmer-scientist collaboration in developing management of late blight, a major fungal disease of potatoes and other plants. Understanding farmers’ knowledge of this and other plant diseases is an important element in furthering such collaboration. Although not all agricultural scientists recognize the value of social
science, this literature search shows that some agricultural scientists now actively collaborate with farmers, in ways that cross the boundary into social science research. During this search, much of the work we found was written by plant pathologists and entomologists. We found over fifty publications on farmer knowledge of crop disease, and we have annotated the material that we thought most relevant to farmer-scientist collaboration for research of crop diseases, especially late blight.

Introduction

In early 1997, International Potato Center (CIP)
plant pathologist Rebecca Nelson asked the authors
to prepare a bibliography on farmer knowledge of
late blight (Phytophthora infestans – a major fungal
disease of potatoes and other plants) to stimulate
further farmer-scientist collaboration in developing
integrated management of the disease. We started by
writing to about 40 researchers who are active in this
area. About half of them responded, and most who did
so suggested publications. To keep the bibliography
concise, we did not completely annotate it. There are
short descriptions for some of the papers that we were
most familiar with and which we thought were most
relevant to farmer-scientist collaboration on late blight
research.

CIP has a well-known social science tradition,
associated with the work of Robert Rhoades and
others.1 But agricultural scientists in general are
becoming more aware of the potential contribution of
social scientists and farmers. Some agricultural scien-
tists are now active in collaborative research with
farmers that cross over the boundary into social
science research. It is a positive sign that much of the
literature we cite here was written by plant pathologists
and entomologists (sometimes working with social
scientists).

There is still a lot to be done. Not all agricul-
tural scientists recognize the value of social science
perspectives, and as this bibliography shows, much
research is still needed on farmer perceptions of crop
health problems. Although we tried to focus on farmer
knowledge of late blight, there was not enough litera-
ture on this important disease to make a bibliography
by itself. The only way to make a reasonable bibli-
ography on “late blight” was by including references
to research on farmer knowledge of crop disease in
general.

Brand

YourPastQuestions Brand

Additional information

Type

Project Topic and Material

Category

Agric Metereology and Water Management

No of Chapters

5

Reference

Yes

Format

PDF

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