Collaboration and Reflexivity in Wildland Fire Risk Governance in the Western United States

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Collaboration and Reflexivity in Wildland Fire Risk Governance in the Western United States, Is A Well-Researched Topic, It Is To Be Used As A Guide Or Framework For Your Research.

ABSTRACT

Public lands in the western United States are experiencing more frequent and higher severity wildland fires due to even-aged forest growth after years of timber extraction, a legacy of aggressive fire suppression, climate change trends, and increasing human development in the wildland-urban interface; this development contributes to the transboundary nature of wildland fire risk and transmission since wildfire moves across boundaries, entangling a diverse array of actors in complex governance systems. For all of these reasons, actors involved in wildland fire risk governance need to explore alternative management strategies that leverage individual and institutional collaborative capacities that account for both the biophysical and social aspects of conjointly constituted wildland fire risk.

This dissertation presents participatory, post-normal mixed-methods research examining collaborative governance of conjointly constituted wildland fire risk and alternative management strategies in transboundary social-ecological systems through Reflexive Sociology. This research is organized around four independent chapters. First, a general technical report, which is a co-produced problem analysis of wildland fire risk in transboundary landscapes, outlines the Co-Management of Fire Risk Transmission partnership.

The second chapter is a qualitative analysis of twenty semi-structured interviews conducted with members of a wildfire governance social network in northcentral Washington. In these interviews, participants described structural opportunities and barriers as well as personal characteristics that facilitate collaboration. The third chapter is a mixed-methods analysis of a proposal to fund forest restoration through carbon offsets. This research included a regression analysis of potential carbon benefits and qualitative analysis of public and peer-reviewed comments on the proposal. Results demonstrated carbon benefits but also illuminated barriers to registering these reductions as carbon offsets. And finally, the fourth chapter is an autoethnographic reflexive essay on this research and my experiences.

Taken together, these chapters cumulatively address different aspects of wildland fire risk governance as a single complex topic. These findings offer insight for improving the collaborative governance of wildland fire risk in this and similar social-ecological systems. Although far from comprehensive, the transdisciplinary nature of this post-normal research provides theoretical and methodological insights into the governance of wildland fire risk in transboundary settings in the face of an uncertain future.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ABSTRACT ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. iii
PUBLIC ABSTRACT ……………………………………………………………………………………………v
DEDICATION …………………………………………………………………………………………………… vii
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ………………………………………………………………………………….. viii
LIST OF TABLES ……………………………………………………………………………………………… xii
LIST OF FIGURES …………………………………………………………………………………………… xiii
CHAPTER
I. INTRODUCTION ……………………………………………………………………………………..1
Acknowledgment of My Positionality as Primary Researcher …………………………..5
Post -Normal Reflexive Sociology on Wildland Fire Risk Governance ………………7
Conjoint Constitution of Social-Ecological Systems and Wildland Fire Risk ……11
Research Design and Audiences ………………………………………………………………….16
References ………………………………………………………………………………………………..23
II. CO-MANAGING FIRE RISK TRANSMISSION IN TRANSBOUNDARY
LANDSCAPES: A GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT …………………………33
Introduction to Transboundary Wildland Fire Risk ………………………………………..34
Theoretical Understanding of Wildland Fire Risk Governance ……………………….42
Understanding Wildland Fire Risk Governance System at Different Scales ……..53
Collaborative Research Methods …………………………………………………………………61
CoMFRT Objectives and Research Methodology ………………………………………….64
Research Work Packages and Findings ………………………………………………………..68
Synthesis of CoMFRT Research Findings and Recommendations …………………..86
Conclusion ……………………………………………………………………………………………….88
References ………………………………………………………………………………………………..92
Appendix 2.1 …………………………………………………………………………………………..112
III. REFLEXIVITY AND PERCEPTIONS OF COLLABORATION BY MEMBERS OF A WILDLAND FIRE RISK GOVERNANCE SOCIAL NETWORK ……………………………………………………………………………………..114
Introduction …………………………………………………………………………………………….115
Relevant Literature and Theoretical Framework ………………………………………….117
Methods………………………………………………………………………………………………….124

Results and Discussion …………………………………………………………………………….130
Conclusion ……………………………………………………………………………………………..153
References ………………………………………………………………………………………………156
Appendix 3.1: Interview Questions ……………………………………………………………166
Appendix 3.2: Interview Instrument …………………………………………………………..167
Appendix 3.3: Contact E-mail …………………………………………………………………..168
Appendix 3.4: Letter of Information …………………………………………………………..169
IV. SAVING THE FOREST FROM THE TREES: EXPERT VIEWS ON FUNDING RESTORATION OF NORTHERN ARIZONA PONDEROSA PINE FORESTS THROUGH REGISTERED CARBON OFFSETS ……….171
Introduction …………………………………………………………………………………………….172
Southwestern Forest Restoration and Generating Carbon Offsets ………………….176
Methods………………………………………………………………………………………………….183
Results ……………………………………………………………………………………………………189
Discussion and Conclusion ……………………………………………………………………….200
References ………………………………………………………………………………………………208
Appendix 4.1: Table of Interaction Coefficients ………………………………………….218
Appendix 4.2: Table of Estimated Surface Carbon for Each Interaction Term …219
V. WHERE THERE IS SMOKE THERE OUGHT TO BE REFLEXIVITY:
AN AUTOETHNOGRAPHIC REFLEXIVE ESSAY ……………………………220
References ………………………………………………………………………………………………255
VI. CONCLUSION ……………………………………………………………………………………264
Implications for Wildland Fire Risk Governance …………………………………………268
Reflexive Sociology in Transdisciplinary Research and Practice …………………..272
Limitations ……………………………………………………………………………………………..275
Directions for Future Research ………………………………………………………………….278
References ………………………………………………………………………………………………284
CURRICULUM VITAE ……………………………………………………………………………………..290

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YourPastQuestions Brand

Additional information

Author

Brett Alan Miller

No of Chapters

6

No of Pages

313

Reference

YES

Format

PDF

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